We reported a few days back on Glasgow Montrose player Ed Ferry’s win in the Major Tournament of the Marymass Congress.  Here’s the first in a couple of game reports from that weekend (notes by Edward Ferry):

(1) Ian C, Mason (1898) – Edward, Ferry (1885)

Marymass Major (5), 24.08.2008

1.e4 c5 2.Nc3 e6 3.f4 In this type of opening, the main line is not clear. so it is not easy to comment on the opening phase.

3…Nc6 4.Nf3 Qc7!?÷ There is not much wrong with this, except that there is no need to commit the Queen just yet. [4…Nge7÷  Is probably a better move order.]

5.g3 a6 6.Bg2!? [6.d4 cxd4 7.Nxd4÷] 6…Nge7 7.0–0 Nd4 8.d3 Nec6 9.Nxd4?! There are better options. The pawn on d4 will be annoying for white.

9…cxd4 10.Ne2 Bc5 11.Kh1!? d6 12.Bd2 [12.f5!? f6!? 13.fxe6 Bxe6 14.Nf4 Bf7÷] 12…e5 13.f5 b5?! [13…f6!?÷]

White to play

Mason vs. Ferry 24/08/08: White to play

14.Ng1?! [14.f6!÷  any other move meant that white lost the opening advantage. It is Black that has to be careful.;

14.f6 g6 (14…gxf6 15.Rxf6 Bg4²  Can only be good for white.) 15.Bh6 Bg4 16.Bg7 Rg8 17.h3 Bxe2 18.Qxe2 h5² Black could have problems once the h file is opened.]

14…f6 15.Qh5+ Qf7 16.Qxf7+ Kxf7 17.Nf3 Bd7 18.Rf2?!³ This wastes a useful tempo, being a potential target for the Bishop.

18…Rhc8 19.g4 h6! I think it is best to play this, as White should not win due to an open h file.

20.h4 Ne7 21.Kh2 Ra7 22.Rh1 Rac7!? 23.Ne1 Bb6 24.Bf3 Rh8 25.Kg2 Bc6 26.Bb4 Rd7 27.Re2 a5 28.Bd2 Rdd8 [28…d5! 29.g5 hxg5 30.hxg5 Rxh1 31.Kxh1 dxe4 32.Bxe4 Bd5³  Rybka 3]

29.g5 hxg5 30.hxg5 Rxh1 [30…g6!?  This looks double edged. 31.fxg6+ Nxg6÷]

31.g6+?!÷ [31.Kxh1! Rh8+ 32.Rh2 Rxh2+ 33.Kxh2=  This was probably Ians best chance of getting a draw.  In this game I needed a win to get at least equal first, however Ian only needed a draw to secure at least first equal.]

Mason vs Ferry. White to move

Mason vs Ferry. White to move

31…Kf8?!÷ At this point I was planning Ng8 as my defensive set up. [31…Kg8³  From actual game, we can see that this would save a tempo.]

32.Kxh1 d5 33.Rh2 Kg8!÷ The King should always be safe here. Blacks pieces are so active on the Queen side, that the threat of a light squared Bishop check are neutralised.

34.Kg2 b4 35.Rh7 Rd7 [35…Rc8?! 36.Bh6! Nxf5 37.Bg4²] 36.Kg3?! [36.exd5! Nxd5=]

36…Rc7 37.Rh2 dxe4 38.dxe4?³ Maybe this is already enough to lose the game? [38.Bxe4!÷]

Mason vs Ferry. Black to play

Mason vs Ferry. Black to play

38…Nc8! 39.Nd3?µ [39.Bc1!? Nd6 40.Rh4³  Although, I think Black would usually win in this position.]

39…Nd6 40.Re2?! Bb7?!µ Is still almost certainly winning. [40…Bb5! 41.Be1 Nc4–+]

41.Be1 Ba6 42.Kg2? [42.Rh2 Nc4 43.Bd2 Bb7 44.Re2µ  This is white only chance to hold on for longer.]

42…Nc4! This wins easily now.

43.Rf2 There was no defence. [ I noticed this nice variation during the game. 43.Bf2 Nxb2! 44.Nxb2 Bxe2 45.Bxe2 Rxc2 46.Bc4+ Kf8–+]

43…Ne3+ 44.Kg3 Rxc2 45.Bd1 Bxd3! Quickest win.

46.Bxc2 Nxc2 47.Bd2 Bxe4 48.Rf1 Bd3 49.Rf2 e4 0–1

With this win I had 4/5 and won the tournament. Board 2 ended in a draw by repetition. Therefore five people shared 2nd place! The last time in 2005 that I entered this Major, I also was in first place.

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